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MUKUTMANIPUR BISHNUPUR BANKURA

Updated: Dec 18, 2023


MUKUTMANIPUR is an ideal getaway where the second largest earthen dam in India is surrounded by mysterious hillocks like a crown or “Mukut”. Nestled at the confluence of two rivers, it is famous for its necklace shaped dam in the green wrapped “Rangamati”. Blessed with the serene nature and breathtaking view of the azure water, Mukutmanipur is a hidden treasure surrounded by green forests and hillocks. Mukutmanipur Dam is considered as the second largest dam in India. Far away from crowd and commercialization, a part of Mukutmanipur still lives in the aroma of tribal culture and offers spectacular sights to the tourists. It is also considered to be a dream destination for photography. To be precise, the ‘Queen of Bankura’ is offering you a perfect holiday time to break the monotony of your hectic schedule. A dream destination for you if you like photography. It’s a bet that you can’t resist yourself from capturing marvelous frames.


Winter comes here wrapping the freshness of festivities. Chilly January welcomes ‘Mukutmanipur Loksanskriti Mela’ with great joy. Folk songs, dances, cultural functions and different types of local artifacts will surely blow your mind. Taste the aroma of a tribal fair and live in a different culture for sometime.

Tusu is a famous harvest festival celebrated by the local people of Mukutmanipur on the last day of ‘Poush’. During the winter (January- February), witness a ritual that is dedicated to the ‘Folk Goddess, Tusu’. The worshippers pray to the goddess for overwhelming wealth and happiness of their household. The lyrics of the folk songs related to this festival are quite different and you are going to love the melody of ‘Santhal’ and ‘Kurmis’.Don’t miss the ‘Cockfighting’ which is arranged by the villagers during Tusu festival.As the last day of ‘Poush’ is called Makar Sankranti, people from ‘Santhal’ community celebrate ‘Makar Parab’ during this time. People enjoy their gala days with meat, rice brew and fowl. A home-made drink named ‘Hanriah’ and dance on Dhamsa Madal’s beats add extra charm to their festivity.


Karam festival is celebrated on ‘Bhadra Ekadashi’ and is mainly arranged for perfect cultivation and happiness of children. During this celebration, only one branch of a Karam tree is being separated from the tree and unmarried girls worship the branch.Bandna(Saharai) is another popular tribal festival celebrated on the sacred day of Kartik Amavasya in the month of November. Villagers give huge importance to their pets as well as animals and they performed the puja mainly for them. People wash their cows and bulls, feed them well, decorate them with ornaments and natural colors. They sing ‘Ohira’ to acknowledge the contribution of the animals in their lives. Celebrating the Saharai festival, Santhal people show their gratitude to ‘Ma Bhagabati’ for golden-yellow paddy fields.




Raicharan Mela usually held in February, is one of the attractions of Mukutmanipur. The mela is named upon a freedom fighter named Raicharan Dhabal Deb who committed suicide instead of giving in himself to the British rulers. People celebrates Raicharan mela to recall his dedication towards the country. Folk culture, local artifacts, handcrafted items and fun-loving people turn the mela into a festivity every year.Palash Utsab is the festival of colors. You will understand how it feels exactly to play ‘Holi’ with Nature itself. Spring comes here with blooming Palash. Mukutmanipur proudly celebrates Palash utsab or Holi in Spring. Cultural functions, sprinkle of ‘Abir’ in the air, the fiery red hue of Palash, blue waterbody accompany the people wearing bright dresses and flower ornaments. Come and celebrate ‘Holi’ and ‘Palash Utsab’ in the lap of “Bonpaharir Rani”.


Kangsabati project

Mukutmanipur Dam


In the year 1956, a giant water dam reservoir was planned at Mukutmanipur, [about 12 km from Khatra town in the district of Bankura, WB], under a big vision mooted by the then CM of Bengal Dr Bidhan Ch. Roy. The Mukutmanipur dam was planned to provide major irrigation facilities to 8,000 square kilometres of agricultural land, stretched across districts such as Bankura, Purulia, Paschim Medinipur, and part of Hooghly. Approximately two kilometres from the lake is the Bangopalpur Reserve Forest, a home of many species of flora and fauna.


Notable attractions

Approximately two kilometers from the lake is the Bangopalpur Reserve Forest, a home of many species of flora and fauna. Four kilometres from the dam is the ancient town of AMBIKANAGAR, once an important place of pilgrimage for JAIN religious followers. However, a flood destroyed most of what remained in the year 1898.

Mukutmanipur is home to a 10.8 km-long man-made mud-banked fresh water barrage. It canalises Kangshabati and Kumari rivers into the three drought affected districts of Bankura, Purulia and Midnapore for irrigation in the summer months.



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